Autistic Students' Strengths Shine in Google SketchUp

04 Oct in Atomic Assist, Special Education & Assistive Technology, curriculum, tech integration, training

This blog post on the Official SketchUp Blog shows how a program called Project Spectrum helps autistic students use Google SketchUp to change their learning.

People with autism tend to be unusually strong visual and spatial thinkers, and it became clear that SketchUp plays to those strengths. With that bit of information (and help from the Autism Society of Boulder County), we launched Project Spectrum with a single goal: connecting the autism community with SketchUp.

For some children on the (autism) spectrum, especially those who are nonverbal, SketchUp serves as a way to communicate allowing them to share their thoughts through images. Other kids learn life skills that help them to achieve educational and career goals they might not have even aspired to before SketchUp. It seems SketchUp builds self-esteem since these children are able to model circles (and squares) around their neurotypical peers."

Project Spectrum was created to give people with autism the opportunity to express their creativity and develop a life skill using Google SketchUp 3D modeling software.

Check out Atomic Learning's training tutorials on Google SketchUp and brainstorm how you can incorporate this software into your curriculum.

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