Windows 10: The Next Chapter - Preview

Microsoft has been busy! In this video, Microsoft® executives share new information about the upcoming Windows 10. It is said to be, "...the first step to an era of more personal computing." Not only get a glance at the new interface, but see how they are taking productivity and gaming to the next level. You will also get a look at the latest technology including the HoloLens and Surface Hub.

Be on the lookout for an exclusive look at Windows 10 from Atomic Learning in the coming weeks!

“Friends of Atomic Learning” Program Expands Training Breadth - Over 220 Hours of Videos Added

Atomic Learning—in a continued effort to help learners connect the dots between learning and life through their online training platform—recently started a partner program to expand the breadth of content available, and add a variety of teaching methodologies. The first three companies to become “Friends of Atomic Learning” and have training added include Bigger Brains, Cartoon Smart, and Ten Ton Online.

The Tech Adoption Curve: Early Majority

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is one of several in a series focusing on various segments of the Technology Adoption Curve.

The first large group you’ll find on the curve is the Early Majority. Those in this group can make or break your initiative—by either building momentum or determining the tool/opportunities in unimportant and not worth their time.

To actually cross the Chasm (where many technology implementations have gone to die), your technology implementation must be adopted by the Early Majority.  As a result, convincing the Early Majority to try the new technology is key to the success of your implementation.

Q&A: Quinsigamond Community College

We asked Pat Schmohl, Dean of Distance Learning and PD from Quinsigamond Community College, a few questions to better understand how their college is using the Custom Training feature from Atomic Learning.

Q: Why did you create your custom training?
A: We have created custom training to make it easier for faculty/staff/students to access the materials they need to know.  We did not want to overload them with all of the trainings.  It is also good to have trainings with a familiar look and feel that they are used to.

Q: What problem/challenge were you trying to resolve?
A: We are trying to improve the adoption of Blackboard and also show people how to use Blackboard Collaborate.  Departments are slowly rolling out Collaborate and we need to allow students/faculty/staff to attend trainings around their busy schedules (or at least have access to materials). 

Q: How did they see Atomic Learning’s custom feature being the solution to solve the problem/challenge?
A: We were able to show a few key tutorials that helped with the main components we were trying to help people learn.  Selecting our own information helped us limit the amount of information shared.

6 Ways to Avoid Death by PowerPoint

"Death By PowerPoint" by Tom Fishburne (Source: tomfishburne.com)While we highly doubt that a bad slidedeck and a monotone speaker has ever resulted in an actual death, the phrase 'Death by PowerPoint' has only grown in popularity as presentation software use becomes a daily part of life, not only for professionals, but students. Take a moment, if you will, to think of one of those large lecture hall courses where students are so busy scrambling to take down every word displayed on the screen that they can't actually listen to what their professor is saying.

It has spawned both internet memes and cartoons (including the hilarious take above by Tom Fishburne), as well as some incredible resources on how to not only ensure your audience survives, but is engaged with your content.

A recent Forbes article by author and leadership development consultant Kristi Hedges is one such resource, and outlines six tips to help resuscitate your presentation, including:

The Tech Adoption Curve: The Chasm

Better understanding the mindsets of your faculty, staff, and students can mean faster adoption, deeper integration, and a higher return on your institution’s investment in technology. To help you build confidence working with different groups of technology users (and non-users) on your campus, this blog post is one of several in a series focusing on various areas of the Technology Adoption Curve.

While we’ve previously discussed different groups of users, specifically Early Adopters and Innovators, this post will instead focus on a part of the Technology Adoption Curve that can mark the end of your campus’ success with a technology project or tool: The Chasm.

This break in the curve is where “shelfware”—technology purchased with good intentions, but not effectively implemented and ends up in storage—first goes on to the shelf.

Citation Help: How-to Properly Cite Social Media Attributes

According to the NMC Horizon Report > 2014 Higher Education Edition, “Social media is changing the way people interact, present ideas and information, and judge the quality of content and contributions.“  That being said, videos, tweets and posts have their time and place in research papers. Make sure to cite them properly.

Here is a quick reference guide to properly cite commonly used social media pieces:

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